11-OcFA11-CoastWEB

11-OcFA11-CoastWEB - Coasts Types of Coasts...

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Coasts Types of Coasts (classification) Beach Features and Processes Coasts and Man (erosion, sea level rise etc.) The interface between the ocean and land: Portion of land affected by ocean processes Complex geological, physical, chemical, biological interaction Zone of interaction between man and ocean About 60% of U.S. (50% global and U.S.) population live in the coastal zone (within 60 km of coast: 17% of land area) Population increasing most rapidly 85% of Florida population live with 15 km of coast 90% of man’s seafood catch from coastal zone (shore to shelf break) Also important for transportation, recreation, tourism $, energy production Vulnerable to pollution, natural variation (climate change, hazards…)
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Classification of Coasts Erosional Coast Features dominated by erosion (deposition still occurs in places) ‘New’ (recent change local sea level) Often tectonically Active margin, ‘rising’ Out of equilibrium Often rough and irregular, ‘rocky’ Sediment availability limited Haven’t been smoothed by ocean processes. Coastal features produced by wave erosion and the distribution of wave energy to the coastline Depositional Coast - ‘old’ - Often Passive margin (subsiding) - In equilibrium - Sediment covered, not rock (ample sediment supply) - Features produced by redistribution of sediments due to wave energy and currents Coastal features vary depending on several factors including: • Currents (e.g. longshore currents) • Wave energy and shoreline shape (focusing of wave energy by wave refraction) The kinds of rocks/sediments along the shore Sealevel stable, sinking, or rising (depends on both global sea-level changes and tectonics
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Erosional Coasts EXAMPLES Fjords: Flooded valleys cut by glaciers. Common in areas affected by glaciers Scandinavia, New Zealand, Northern Canada Volcanic Coasts: e.g. Hawaii: fresh rock added to coastline, little sediment Faulted coasts: Regions where faults have divided, uplifted or down-dropped coast e.g. California: Vertical displacement on faults can rapidly reset position of coastline Coral Atolls/Uplifted reefs: limited sediment availability . New ‘rock’ added via coral growth
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course OCE 1001 taught by Professor Smith during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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11-OcFA11-CoastWEB - Coasts Types of Coasts...

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