Hanford-1 - Hanford: how not to manage radioactive wastes...

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1 Hanford: how not to manage radioactive wastes "I had a notion, more from intuition than anything else, that he said to me, ‘we are lost.’" —Henry Lawson in “Journey to the Center of the Earth” by Jules Verne. Hanford Site in Washington By 1963, nine nuclear reactors and five reprocessing plants. 177 underground waste tanks were built. Peak production from 1956 to 1965. Produced about 63 short tons of Pu, supplying the majority of the 60,000 weapons in the U.S. arsenal.
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2 Hanford in 1960 Hanford Introduction
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3 Hanford background The only purpose of the Hanford facility was to produce Pu for warheads. 238 U was feed to up to 9 reactors. The Pu was extracted from the SNF using the Purex process. Waste management was a crude afterthought. The PUREX facility
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4 Mixed wastes in tanks The 177 underground storage tanks contain about 55 million gallons of waste at pH 9 to 14 in 19** Dissolved cladding Raffinate with fission products Organic solvents All mixed with NaOH 12 of the 177 waste tanks
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2011 for the course NPRE 442 taught by Professor Stubbins during the Fall '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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Hanford-1 - Hanford: how not to manage radioactive wastes...

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