Also dealt with in this section is one more highly individual character in this Karamazov tangle of

Also dealt with in this section is one more highly individual character in this Karamazov tangle of

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Also dealt with in this section is one more highly individual character in this Karamazov tangle of  personalities — the village idiot, "stinking Lizaveta," whose depiction grandly displays Dostoevsky's  greatness in capturing the essentials that round out and animate his cast of minor characters. Here,  in a few sure strokes, he creates a grotesque creature to whom we respond as a human being.  Lizaveta is strikingly real; we believe in this creature who sleeps in barns and in passageways and  whose appearance is so repulsive that some people are actually appalled. And we learn that it was  Karamazov who fathered her child; now all of his noxious qualities suddenly become putrescent. To  dare think that anyone might embrace her is shocking, but to think that Karamazov satisfied his lust  upon her is to equate him with a barbaric and sordid savage; the man is bestial. He later tells Ivan  and Alyosha that "there are no ugly women. The fact that she is a woman is half the battle."
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Also dealt with in this section is one more highly individual character in this Karamazov tangle of

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