An important question evoked by this passage is whether or not Christ was refusing the temptations

An important question evoked by this passage is whether or not Christ was refusing the temptations

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Unformatted text preview: An important question evoked by this passage is whether or not Christ was refusing the temptations security through bread, authority, and miracle for Himself alone, or whether by refusing He was doing so for all mankind and placing a burden too tremendous upon such a frail creature as man. If Christ refused solely for Himself, His refusal does not carry such heavy implications because He was divine and could easily afford to resist such temptations. But if He was refusing for all mankind, then it follows that He expects man to believe in something intangible even while He does not have enough to eat. To complicate the matter, the Grand Inquisitor places his questions in the terms of being asked by "the wise and dread spirit," who offers Christ three things. Christ is clearly the rejector, but not for Himself alone for all mankind. And when the Grand Inquisitor states, "The statement of those Himself alone for all mankind....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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