At first -...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
At first, Dmitri thinks it only a matter of time before he will be able to convince the officials of his  innocence, but as the questions and the evidence begin to mount around him, he begins to see the  seriousness of his position. It is then that he undergoes a change. He realizes the need for a  transformation. He confesses almost every detail of his life and is bitterly ashamed. Because the  officials write down the sorry details of his past, he is even more deeply ashamed. He is quick to see that he is not guilty of the murder but that he is indeed guilty. So often he boasted  of killing his father and so often he wished for his father's death; now all that is on trial and he stands  literally naked before the probing magistrates. The shame of his entire life is revealed in all its  disgusting corruptness. In many of his novels, Dostoevsky is concerned with the actions of police — how officials conduct 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online