Candide invoked the name of Pangloss and declared that he must renounce optimism

Candide invoked the name of Pangloss and declared that he must renounce optimism

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Candide invoked the name of Pangloss and declared that he must renounce optimism, which he now  saw as "a mania for insisting that everything is all right, when everything is going wrong." The sight  of the maimed man made him weep. In Surinam, they first asked a Spanish captain if any ship in the harbor could be sent to Buenos  Aires. The captain offered to give them passage for a fair price, and a meeting at an inn was  arranged. At that meeting, Candide, with his free and open disposition, told the captain all that had  happened to him. When the captain learned that the youth wanted to rescue Cunégonde, he  declared that he would never take Candide to Buenos Aires because if he did, both would be hanged  since the lady was the governor's favorite. Candide, crushed by this decision, drew Cacambo aside 
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