Eldorado is Voltaire

Eldorado is Voltaire - Eldorado is Voltaire's ideal world,...

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Unformatted text preview: Eldorado is Voltaire's ideal world, one that he knew could never exist, but which provided him with the means to point out grievous shortcomings of the real world how very far short of perfection it really was; and this was another way in which he attacked the doctrine of philosophic optimism. Of course, it may well be argued that, given a land rich enough that all have plenty, most people would be utopians devoid of rapacity. For if indeed avarice is the root of all evil, as Chaucer's Pardoner insisted, there existed no such root in Voltaire's utopia and therefore none of the evils found elsewhere. So it would seem that the superior civilization of the Eldoradoans does not really redound to their credit: they simply have been incredibly lucky, but there is more to it than this. Voltaire used his utopia to provide emphatic contrast with what Candide had experienced elsewhere in Westphalia, where life once seemed ideal to the youth, thanks especially to Pangloss' arguments;...
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Eldorado is Voltaire - Eldorado is Voltaire's ideal world,...

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