In the complex spirit of the novel and in the leisurely nineteenth

In the complex spirit of the novel and in the leisurely nineteenth

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In the complex spirit of the novel and in the leisurely nineteenth-century fashion of giving the intricate  background of the main characters, Dostoevsky begins his book, then immediately establishes its  tone. He first announces the element of mystery in the novel — the "gloomy and tragic death" of  Karamazov — and then begins defining the elements of tragedy — especially the Karamazov  tragedy. The older Karamazov is depicted as base, vulgar, ill-natured, and completely degraded, and his  "tragic" death will be revealed to be tragic only because his sons are implicated in the death — not  because Karamazov himself arouses tragic emotion. In fact, in the trial scene later in the book, it is  pointed out that the murder is not a parricide in the truest sense because Fyodor Karamazov never  functioned as a proper father. To support this idea, Dostoevsky begins at the very outset of the novel 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online