It has been held that the pompous Baron of Thunder

It has been held - It has been held that the pompous Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh is one of the representations of Frederick the Great with whom

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Unformatted text preview: It has been held that the pompous Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh is one of the representations of Frederick the Great, with whom Voltaire had such close relations for so long a time. Later, as we shall see, it is the baron's son who appears to be identified as the Prussian ruler. Here the original identification is justified in view of the fact that the son is said to be very much like his father. The latter is depicted as one who is inordinately vain and all-powerful. He is always addressed as "My Lord"; all those who serve him laugh appreciably at his stories. Among the more ingenious theories is that Candide to some extent represents Voltaire here, as he does elsewhere in the tale from time to time. The Frenchman is said to have suspected that he was illegitimate, and he began life sufficiently optimistic and satisfied with the world. It has further been illegitimate, and he began life sufficiently optimistic and satisfied with the world....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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