It is Voltaire the literary critic who proved most interesting in this section

It is Voltaire the literary critic who proved most interesting in this section

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Unformatted text preview: It is Voltaire the literary critic who proved most interesting in this section. In other works, for example the satiric Le Pauvre Diable (1758), he had attacked the "writing rabble." Having himself been the target of adversely critical remarks made by would-be critics, Voltaire made the most of the chance to castigate the breed. In order to provide evidence of the critic's intellectual limitations, he quoted him as denouncing the playwright as "a man who does not believe in innate ideas." Voltaire himself followed Locke's view of the mind as originally tabula rasa, a blank slate or tablet, rather than Descartes' theory of innate ideas. On two occasions, the author provided some personal satire. When Candide asked the abbé what he meant by "hack" the abbé replied: "A man who writes for cheap rags. A F — — ." The reference is to Fréron (whose name in full is provided in some translations), a journalist with whom Voltaire...
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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