Ivan finishes his story and wonders now if Alyosha will reject him or will try to accept him as a br

Ivan finishes his story and wonders now if Alyosha will reject him or will try to accept him as a br

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Unformatted text preview: Ivan finishes his story and wonders now if Alyosha will reject him or will try to accept him as a brother. As an answer, Alyosha leans forward and kisses his brother. "You are plagiarizing my poem," Ivan cries in delight. The brothers leave the restaurant together, but then they part, each going his separate way. In the chapter preceding "The Grand Inquisitor," Ivan struggles with the problem of suffering humanity and the injustice of this world. Now he turns to one of the major philosophical questions one that has worried the Western world for centuries: the awesome burden placed upon man by his having complete freedom instead of church-directed happiness and security. Dostoevsky achieves his dramatic impact in this chapter by having the two antagonists embody the two ideas in question the Grand Inquisitor pleading for security and happiness for man; Christ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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Ivan finishes his story and wonders now if Alyosha will reject him or will try to accept him as a br

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