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The first thing to be noted is the adroit way in which Voltaire effects his transitions to a new epi

The first thing to be noted is the adroit way in which Voltaire effects his transitions to a new epi

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Unformatted text preview: The first thing to be noted is the adroit way in which Voltaire effects his transitions to a new episode and how he maintains suspense. The old woman appears like a deus ex machina just at the critical moment when Candide had no idea which way to turn. Note further the time that elapsed and Candide's repeated inquiries before the discovery of Cunégonde's identity. Next, it is apparent that the experiences of Cunégonde, in their violence and melodramatic quality, parallel those of Candide and provide counterpoint. In character also, the two lovers complement each other. Both continued to revere Doctor Pangloss; although Cunégonde was beginning to feel much less sure than Candide, neither completely abandoned the optimistic philosophy inculcated by their mentor. Note that Candide's discovery of Cunégonde parallels his discovery of Pangloss: he had thought that both were dead. With fine irony, Voltaire had Cunégonde say that it pleased Heaven had thought that both were dead....
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The first thing to be noted is the adroit way in which Voltaire effects his transitions to a new epi

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