The second utopia in this section is that of the Oreillons

The second utopia in this section is that of the Oreillons...

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Unformatted text preview: The second utopia in this section is that of the Oreillons, who existed in a pure state of nature, uncontaminated by manmade Western civilization; Jesuit Paraguay was beyond the borders of their land. All this relates to the concept of the noble savage, which became increasingly popular in the latter half of the eighteenth century. The idea was that nature itself was benign and good; let man live in a state of pure nature and he in turn will be good. Pangloss had embraced this philosophy of primitivism, as we learn from Candide. The name Oreillons derives from the Spanish Orejones, which indicates "pierced ears" or "big ears." Voltaire remained ironical in his account of these utopians. Understandably, Candide began to question all that had been taught him about "natural" man when it appeared that Oreillons were going to boil or roast him, but once his life was spared because he was not a Jesuit, he was no longer doubtful. The obvious conclusion is that the primitive because he was not a Jesuit, he was no longer doubtful....
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The second utopia in this section is that of the Oreillons...

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