The significant incident in this first chapter involves Pangloss

The significant incident in this first chapter involves Pangloss

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Unformatted text preview: The significant incident in this first chapter involves Pangloss' illicit relations with a still unnamed chambermaid. Cunégonde herself witnessed with great interest the act, which took place in a little wood on her father's estate. So intrigued was she with this lesson in "experimental physics" and the demonstration of sufficient reason involving cause and effect that she was determined to experiment herself with the cooperation of Candide. The opportunity presented itself when the two found themselves behind a screen, but the baron discovered them. Cunégonde received a slap on the face, but poor Candide was literally kicked out of the castle. He was now an exile from his best of all possible worlds in Westphalia. It has been held that the pompous Baron of Thunder-ten-tronckh is one of the representations of Frederick the Great, with whom Voltaire had such close relations for so long a time. Later, as we Frederick the Great, with whom Voltaire had such close relations for so long a time....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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