These chapters are particularly interesting because in them Voltaire described two utopian states of

These chapters are particularly interesting because in them Voltaire described two utopian states of

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These chapters are particularly interesting because in them Voltaire described two utopian states of  sorts. It has been argued that life at the castle in Westphalia was utopian for Candide prior to the  difficulty that led to his expulsion. But the utopias in this section are more easily identified as such.  The first is the Jesuit utopia in Paraguay, where the Fathers had established a theocratic tyranny.  One might very well call it a counter-utopia because it was an ideal state only if one were a Jesuit in  the country. It was Cacambo who, not without irony, first described the utopia in glowing terms: "It is  an admirable thing, this government.  Los Padres  (the Fathers) have everything and the people  nothing; it is a masterpiece of reason and justice." The splendor in which the Jesuits of Paraguay  lived was well illustrated by the description of the commandant's arbor, with its colonnade in green  and gold marble. And it will be recalled that Candide was served an excellent breakfast prepared in  vessels of gold, whereas the native Paraguayans ate corn in wooden bowls out in the open fields 
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These chapters are particularly interesting because in them Voltaire described two utopian states of

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