To be sure Voltaire did not lose any opportunity for anti

To be sure Voltaire did not lose any opportunity for anti -...

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Unformatted text preview: To be sure Voltaire did not lose any opportunity for anti-religious satire. Warring churchmen especially were his target here. It was a nice touch for him to report that the Jesuit commandant had been to Mass and then had hurried to the parade ground. The intelligence that the practical, ingenious Cacambo had been successively a choirboy, sacristan, and monk, as well as merchant's agent, soldier, and lackey, has its place in carrying forward the satire. And in Chapter XIII, we learn that a Franciscan in truth had stolen Cungonde's money and jewels and was hanged when the jewels were recognized as having belonged to another churchman, the Grand Inquisitor. Related to all this is Voltaire's rejection of the Providential theory, that of a benign deity who is constantly concerned with the lot of mankind. This is implicit in Cacambo's remark that Cungonde would be concerned with the lot of mankind....
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2011 for the course ENGLISH 1001 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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