Voltaire did not relent in his running battle against religion and the Church

Voltaire did not relent in his running battle against religion and the Church

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Unformatted text preview: Voltaire did not relent in his running battle against religion and the Church. The old woman, we learn, turned out to be the illegitimate daughter of a pope. Of great interest is a note that first appeared in an 1829 edition of Candide, one that has been attributed to Voltaire himself, despite the late date of publication: "Note the author's extreme discretion! So far there has been no pope named Urban X; he is afraid to ascribe a bastard daughter to a known pope. What circumspection! What delicacy of conscience." If these are not Voltaire's words, they at least are quite Voltarian and provide a good example of his sardonic wit. Voltaire scored a hit again, this time against warring popes who maintained armies when he described the soldiers who were expected to defend the ladies as being more cowardly than the pope's soldiers....
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Voltaire did not relent in his running battle against religion and the Church

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