Voltaire once more found the opportunity to satirize wittily inordinate pride and vanity

Voltaire once more found the opportunity to satirize wittily inordinate pride and vanity

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Unformatted text preview: Voltaire once more found the opportunity to satirize wittily inordinate pride and vanity. Note the pretentious list of names used by the governor of Buenos Aires, who never dreamed that Cungonde or any woman would reject his offer of marriage. He spoke to his men "with the noblest disdain, his nose in the air, his voice raised pitilessly." Add to this the Jesuit baron's reaction to Candide's announcement that he expected to marry the aristocratic Cungonde he, a commoner, and she, a baron's daughter with seventy-two quarterings to the family coat of arms! Personal satire finds a place in these chapters. It will be remembered that, in the person of the original baron in Westphalia, Voltaire was poking fun at Frederick the Great. And we were told that the son, whom we now have met as the Jesuit commandant, was much like his father. Therefore, the the son, whom we now have met as the Jesuit commandant, was much like his father....
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