A more obvious example of incongruity is the scene between Absalon and Alison at her window

A more obvious example of incongruity is the scene between Absalon and Alison at her window

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A more obvious example of incongruity is the scene between Absalon and Alison at her window.  Absalon, the incense thrower, is accustomed to smells that are sweet, exotic, and sensuous. He is  effeminate, delicate, fastidious, and yet he is subjected to the ultimate humiliation when Alison  presents her "arse" to be kissed and Absalon does so. As for characterization, the presentation of Alison is filled with details that identify her as some  innocent and joyful natural creature — the weasel's suppleness, the softness of a wether's wool (a  wether is an older lamb), the singing of a swallow on a barn, and so on. The same joyful nature  underlies her response to Absalon's horror after her trick: "'Tehee!' quod she, and clapte the wyndow  to." There is such innocent joy in her vulgar trick. The neatness of the tale goes far beyond the comic inevitability of its plot. In the medieval view, 
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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