{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

And when Pangloss expressed the hope that he and the dervish might discuss effects and causes

And when Pangloss expressed the hope that he and the dervish might discuss effects and causes

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
And when Pangloss expressed the hope that he and the dervish might discuss effects and causes,  the nature of evil, and pre-established harmony — in short Leibnitzian philosophy — the dervish shut  the door in his face. Voltaire had lost faith in systematic philosophy. In the first two of these three chapters, as in the earlier ones, Candide's attitude vacillated, but he  had never entirely abandoned the optimistic faith taught to him by Pangloss. However, in the final  chapter, after the conversation with the old man who owned the twenty acres of cultivated land, he  finally became convinced that man cannot understand the evil in the world. Therefore man should  not make it worse by vain perplexities. He should attend to the counsels of moderation and good  sense and let the narrow bounds of his knowledge at least teach him restraint. Above all, let him find 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}