Cacambo had made arrangements for Candide and himself to sail aboard a ship commanded by a Turkish c

Cacambo had made arrangements for Candide and himself to sail aboard a ship commanded by a Turkish c

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Unformatted text preview: Cacambo had made arrangements for Candide and himself to sail aboard a ship commanded by a Turkish captain under orders of the Sultan Ahmed. Both prostrated themselves before his "miserable Highness." En route, Candide, in whose breast hope sprang eternal, contemplated the lot of the six kings he had met in Venice and compared their lot with his own, now that he was flying to the arms of Cungonde. He assured Martin that Pangloss had been right: "All is well." Martin could only express his hope that the youth was right. Unlike his companion, he saw nothing extraordinary in the fact that they had dined with six dethroned rulers; such dethronements were common enough. Candide turned to Cacambo and asked him many questions about Cungonde. What was she doing? Was she still the peerless beauty? Had Cacambo bought her a palace in Constantinople? He doing?...
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