Following this class are pilgrims whose high social rank is mainly derived from commercial wealth

Following this class are pilgrims whose high social rank is mainly derived from commercial wealth

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Following this class are pilgrims whose high social rank is mainly derived from commercial wealth.  Included in this group are the Merchant, who illegally made much of his money from selling French  coins (a practice that was forbidden in England at the time); the Sergeant of Law, who made his  fortune by using his knowledge as a lawyer to buy up foreclosed property for practically nothing; the  Clerk, who belongs with this group of pilgrims because of his gentle manners and extensive  knowledge of books; and the Franklin, who made enough money to become a country gentleman  and is in a position to push for a noble station. (It is evident both from the relationship of the  Franklin's portrait to that of the guildsmen, presented next, and from Harry Bailey's scornful remarks  to him, however, that he is not yet of the noble class). The next class of pilgrims is the guildsmen, consisting of men who belong to something similar to 
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