Now Candide had to admit that Martin had won the entire wager

Now Candide had to admit that Martin had won the entire wager

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Now Candide had to admit that Martin had won the entire wager. He gave Paquette 2,000 piasters  and Giroflée 1,000 — sure that the money would make both happy. But Martin was not so sure:  perhaps the money would lead them to greater unhappiness. Observing the fact that he often found  again people whom he had been sure were lost forever, Candide now believed that there was a good  chance of his finding Cunégonde. Martin remained pessimistic; for him happiness in this world was a  very scarce commodity. Candide called his attention to the singing gondoliers; surely they were  happy. Let Candide see them at home, said Martin, with their wives and brats of children; then he  would think otherwise. He conceded that the lot of a gondolier was probably a better one than that of  the Doge (the city's chief magistrate). Candide then said that the Venetians spoke of Senator 
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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