Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne was written during the early days of Dece

Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne was written during the early days of Dece

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne  was written during the early days of December 1755. It was a  work of accretion, the final version published in 1756 one hundred and eighty lines in length. Voltaire's poem properly may be called an indispensable introduction to  Candide;  in both works he  came to grips with reality. Practically every question advanced in the poem appears at least implicitly  in the prose tale. Both are savage attacks upon optimism. Aside from form and medium, the  essential difference between the two works lies in the fact that irony, mockery, ridicule, high spirits,  and broad humor have no place in the poem. Voltaire was deadly serious throughout, and the tone is  one of deep pity for the lot of humanity in a world where both the innocent and the guilty are pawns  of fate. Quite as interesting as the poem itself is the preface that Voltaire provided. In the words of Ira O. 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online