The Physician concludes his tale with the moral that

The Physician concludes his tale with the moral that - The...

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Unformatted text preview: The Physician concludes his tale with the moral that "the wages of sin is Death" and let everyone forsake his sins. Many Chaucerian critics find this tale to be among the weakest, the least well constructed, and direly lacking in motivation. For some, it is part romance, part moral allegory, and part realistic horror. Viewing the tale as a moral allegory, it is the story of a man (Virginius one who upholds purity) who, to save his virtuous daughter from a wicked judge (Appius), cuts off her head. The wicked judge hangs himself when thrown in prison, and his henchman, Claudius, and the other conspirators are exiled or hanged. The child, Virginia, represents Christian purity (virginity), and the false judge, Appius, may be identified with impurity. As a moral allegory, the tale lies in the tradition of many moral allegories of the fourteenth century. But always with Chaucer, the value of the tale lies in the moral allegories of the fourteenth century....
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