Milo Minderbinder is the most obvious representative of the theme of greed in the novel

Milo Minderbinder is the most obvious representative of the theme of greed in the novel

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Milo Minderbinder is the most obvious representative of the theme of greed in the novel, but he is not alone; excessive ambition is also a kind of greed, personified by Colonel Cathcart and General Peckem, among others. Milo is a brilliant but corrupt entrepreneur who manipulates his position as mess officer into personal direction of a syndicate (M & M Enterprises) that controls the black market. When Milo's greed gets out of hand, his cash flow is strapped due to a purchase of the entire Egyptian cotton crop. Desperate for funds, Milo contracts with the Germans to bomb his own squadron's base on Pianosa. Heller details the bombing and strafing, during which Milo's pilots spare the landing strip and mess hall so they can land and enjoy a hot meal before retiring. As Milo likes to say, "What's so terrible about that?" For Milo, a contract is a contract; whatever is good for M & M say, "What's so terrible about that?...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online