One of the aspects of Heller

One of the aspects of Heller - '...

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One of the aspects of Heller's style is a disjointed logic familiar to viewers of comic routines popular  during World War II, such as the Marx Brothers' dialogues or Abbott and Costello's "Who's on First?"  An early example is the exchange between Yossarian and Clevinger in Chapter 2. Yossarian  complains, "They're trying to kill me." "Who's they?" asks Clevinger. "Who, specifically, do you think  is trying to murder you?" Yossarian answers, "Every one of them." The dialogue continues: "Every one of whom?" "Every one of whom do you think?" "I haven't any idea." "Then how do you know they aren't?" Part of Yossarian's problem is that he quite justifiably, quite sanely thinks that the enemy gunners  shooting at his plane are trying to kill him! He takes it personally. Clevinger, who is very bright but a  conformist, accepts the madness of war as reasonable. Other characters introduced in these chapters are of varying importance. The Texan is a very 
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One of the aspects of Heller - '...

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