The dialogue between Yossarian and the psychiatrist plays on some of the stereotypes of Freudian ana

The dialogue between Yossarian and the psychiatrist plays on some of the stereotypes of Freudian ana

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Unformatted text preview: The dialogue between Yossarian and the psychiatrist plays on some of the stereotypes of Freudian analysis. Sanderson always is looking for some hidden meaning in what the patient says. The doctor offers Yossarian a cigarette. Yossarian declines. Immediately, Sanderson accuses Yossarian of having "a strong aversion to accepting a cigarette from me." The patient points out that he just finished one; it's still smoldering in the ashtray. "That's a very ingenious explanation," says Sanderson. "But I suppose we'll soon discover the true reason." Sanderson insists that the patient's name is Fortiori and that "Yossarian" and "Dunbar" are imaginary figures whom the patient blames for everything. Finally, the doctor believes he has his patient cornered. Sanderson asks if it has ever occurred to the patient that he is promiscuous because he is "merely trying to assuage [his]...
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