Women had contributed significantly to the war effort by filling jobs in industry as well as serving

Women had contributed significantly to the war effort by filling jobs in industry as well as serving

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Unformatted text preview: Women had contributed significantly to the war effort by filling jobs in industry as well as serving in the armed forces. Some chose to continue with professional careers, an important step in the emancipation of women in the twentieth century. Others chose to return to traditional roles as housewives, opening more jobs for the returning men. This process took time, and the wait was difficult for many individuals. The strain was buffered by the GI Bill but exacerbated by inflation. The GI Bill of Rights provided educational and other financial opportunities for returning members of the armed forces. Literally tens of thousands of service personnel, who otherwise would not have been able to afford it, attended college. A serious problem, however, was inflation. During the war, the emergency Office of Price Administration had kept costs in check. After its elimination, inflation the emergency Office of Price Administration had kept costs in check....
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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