Almost all Eastern European Jewish immigrants after 1870 stopped in New York City

Almost all Eastern European Jewish immigrants after 1870 stopped in New York City

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Almost all Eastern European Jewish immigrants after 1870 stopped in New York City. A great number of them stayed there and found their way to a section of New York called the Lower East Side, a twenty-square-block area south of Houston Street and east of the Bowery. By 1910, about 542,000 Jews lived in this area, and overcrowding became a growing concern. The streets were crowded, but the tiny apartments in which the immigrants lived were often worse. One immigrant remembers sharing two rooms with two parents and five other boarders — people taken in to help pay the rent. As Gerald Sorin recounts in his book A Time for Building: The Third Migration , "The cantor rehearses, a train passes, the shoemaker bangs, ten brats run around like goats, and at night we all try to get some sleep in the stifling roach-infested two rooms." At this time, the garment industry was experiencing great growth in the United States, with New York...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online