Culturally - Culturally, the Jews are divided between...

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Unformatted text preview: Culturally, the Jews are divided between ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Jews and Modern Orthodox Jews. For example, although all male Orthodox children attend yeshivas, some yeshivas (including Reuven Malter's) teach more English subjects than other yeshivas do (including Danny Saunders'). Language also separates the different Orthodox Jews: Reuven learns about Jewish subjects in Hebrew; Danny learns these subjects in Yiddish. By mentioning this language difference, Potok introduces the importance that lan-guage or, in Danny's case, silence plays in the novel. Danny Saunders and Reuven Malter represent these two Orthodox Jewish sects: Hasidic Jews and Modern Orthodox Jews, respectively. Potok establishes the boys' religious rivalry by having each as the leader of his softball team. Interestingly, no matter what their religious differences, they can find common ground in the very American game of softball. Note that the boys' yeshivas introduced common ground in the very American game of softball....
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Culturally - Culturally, the Jews are divided between...

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