Most Jews who came to the United States during the colonial period were Sephardim

Most Jews who came to the United States during the colonial period were Sephardim

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Unformatted text preview: Most Jews who came to the United States during the colonial period were Sephardim descendents of Spanish Jews. ( Sepharad is the Hebrew word for Spain.) Jews were expelled from Spain in 1492, and Spanish Jews immigrated to Holland, the Ottoman Empire (which included parts of Europe, Asia, and North Africa), and some areas of the Americas in search of refuge. Although the Jewish population in colonial America was small, Jews embraced their new homeland and accommodated themselves into the majority Christian population. By the early nineteenth century, some Sephardic Jews in America had even converted to Christianity. Other Jews who arrived in the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries came from Central Europe and spread throughout the United States, establishing communities in almost every state. These Jews had suffered persecution in Europe since the First Crusade in the eleventh state....
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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