One of the greatest contrasts between Reb Saunders and David Malter in the novel is their individual

One of the greatest contrasts between Reb Saunders and David Malter in the novel is their individual

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Unformatted text preview: One of the greatest contrasts between Reb Saunders and David Malter in the novel is their individual reactions on learning of the inconceivable number of Jews killed in the German concentration camps during World War II. "How the world makes us suffer," Reb Saunders says to Reuven and Danny. "It is the will of God. We must accept the will of God." Because the horror of the deaths is incomprehensible to Reb Saunders, he concludes that the killings are God's will; if God had not let the Holocaust happen, it wouldn't have. He can do nothing but accept that this is God's will. David Malter's reaction is as emotionally strong as Reb Saunders', but he assumes an active role in defining what should now happen following the mass killings. When Reuven tells his father about Reb Saunders' comments concerning God's will, Mr. Malter responds, "We cannot wait for God. If Reb Saunders' comments concerning God's will, Mr....
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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