Potok treasured his Jewish religion and culture but believed that change was necessary and unavoidab

Potok treasured his Jewish religion and culture but believed that change was necessary and unavoidab

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Unformatted text preview: Potok treasured his Jewish religion and culture but believed that change was necessary and unavoidable. Not surprisingly, he tried to blend American and Jewish ways while he attended New York's Yeshiva University, a Jewish-sponsored school offering both religious and nonreligious courses. He received a B.A., summa cum laude, in English literature from Yeshiva University in 1950. After his graduation from Yeshiva University, Potok studied for and received ordination as a rabbi in 1954 at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, a New York institution sponsored by the Conservative branch of Judaism, a less restrictive form of Judaism in terms of religious observances and behaviors. Whereas the Orthodox Jewish movement frowns upon religious change, the Conservative movement suggests that change has always been a feature of Jewish tradition. While studying for rabbinic ordination, Potok also earned a master's degree in Hebrew literature from the...
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