The confrontation between David Malter and Reb Saunders about religious ideology spills over into Re

The confrontation between David Malter and Reb Saunders about religious ideology spills over into Re

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The confrontation between David Malter and Reb Saunders about religious ideology spills over into Reuven and Danny's college life. Reuven is friendly with the non-Hasidic students, many of whom he went to high school with, but he doesn't "mix much" with the Hasidic students. Likewise, Danny befriends the Hasidic students but not the non-Hasidic ones. Each group of students confronts the other concerning the question of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. Their conflict parallels that between David Malter and Reb Saunders. Reuven and Danny's heated discussion about the value of experimental psychology and Freud reveals their respective world views. Reuven argues that Freudians aren't willing to test their theories in the real world; therefore, their theories are merely assumptions. Later in Chapter 13, Professor Appleman, Danny's psychology professor, emphasizes to Danny that Freud might have been a...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online