The hatred that Reuven feels for Danny blinds him to any good qualities that Danny possesses

The hatred that Reuven feels for Danny blinds him to any good qualities that Danny possesses

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Unformatted text preview: The hatred that Reuven feels for Danny blinds him to any good qualities that Danny possesses. He cannot believe that Danny is sorry for hurting him, even when Mr. Malter tells him that Danny is. At the end of Chapter 2, note that Reuven cannot comprehend what it would be like to be blind. He thinks to himself, "I couldn't imagine what it was like to know that no matter whether my eyes were opened or closed it made no difference, everything was still dark." Ironically, however, at this point in the novel Reuven is metaphorically blind: He cannot accept the possibility that Danny might feel truly sorry for hitting him in the eye with the ball. David Malter's bringing a radio to Reuven's hospital room so that Reuven can listen to how the war is progressing is an example of Mr. Malter's belief that Jews should not shut themselves off to the progressing is an example of Mr....
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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