These Central European Jews often became peddlers or opened retail shops

These Central European Jews often became peddlers or opened retail shops

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Unformatted text preview: These Central European Jews often became peddlers or opened retail shops. By the middle of the nineteenth century, at a time when the United States economy was rapidly expanding, Jewish businesses had become important to the country's economic development. Throughout the country, Jewish peddlers brought merchandise to less-populated towns and villages that had no retail stores. In the folklore and history of American Jews, peddling is described as the way in which some immigrants gradually moved into retail businesses. The usual retail store was small, although some Jewish immigrants built great department stores. In Europe, before coming to the United States, these Jews had experienced a relaxation of the Orthodox tenets of their Jewish faith. Consequently, when they got to the United States, they created communities founded on the principle of reforming Judaism to fit a more secular way of life. The communities founded on the principle of reforming Judaism to fit a more secular way of life....
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2011 for the course ENGLISH 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at Texas State.

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These Central European Jews often became peddlers or opened retail shops

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