CourseNotes.58 - We can treat randomly polarized light as...

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Unformatted text preview: We can treat randomly polarized light as being the sum of two waves, one polarized in the x direction and the other polarized in the y direction. If we send this light through a special piece of material called a polarizer, then only the component of the wave which is polarized in the direction of the polarizer will be transmitted. This has two effects, it leaves the output wave polarized in the direction of the polarizer and it reduces the intensity of the wave by 1/2. I = 1 2 I If we send light which is already polarized through one of these polarizers, then only a portion of the light will be transmitted. The amount transmitted now depends on the angle between the polarizers axis and the polarization of the incoming light wave. If the axis of the polarizer is rotated 90 with respect to the light wave, then none of the light will be transmitted. For a general angle between the polarization of the light and the polarizers axis, the amount of intensity transmitted is given by I =...
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