Lecture 10 - Mills defense of Utilitarianism Both Mill and...

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Mill’s defense of Utilitarianism Both Mill and Bentham give accounts of utilitarianism. Mill provides responses to direct objections that surface since Bentham or predating Bentham. Mill does not provide a constructive argument but rather a defensive one. He does not build utilitarianism. The first challenge is the right to be happy. We all strive to be happy (principle of utility). The challenge is “what right do you have to be happy?” Mill has several answers to this. If happiness is being talked of, happiness must be defined. If by happiness one has something realistic instead of an exalted state, one can have happiness. Happiness is not a life of rapture but rather a life where pains are minimal (but moments of rapture still exist) and the rest is moderate. Happiness is accessible to all. He believes some thwart their own happiness by being greedy and not looking to the good of others. There is enough happiness to go around. It isn't that just a few can be happy at the expense of others. Everyone needs education and ample opportunity. Given that premise there is plenty to go around, the world is sufficiently complex to engage us and challenge us and keep us committed to our goods. Finally, the negative parts of life, pain, are largely
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Lecture 10 - Mills defense of Utilitarianism Both Mill and...

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