Chapter 20 - Chapter 20: The Holocene: Also known as The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 20: The Holocene: Also known as The interval, is the Neogene epoch that extends to the present from the most recent retreat of continental glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere, about 11,600 years ago. It stands out as a unique geologic interval, both because of its brevity and because humans have altered it by hunting, cutting trees and planting crops, and building towns and cities, burning fossil fuels, and creating vast networks of com munication and transportation. Holocene sediments and fossils are fully within the range of radiocarbon dating, so they can be dated with great precision. Also use fossil records of species to characterize habitats. Holocene shows how the Earth system has approached its present state. The Retreat of Glaciers: Temperature of the Rocky mountain region began to rise and this was proven by the insect species that have survived. The melt waters have flown to the sea which has begun to rise as well. Moraines reveal that the retreat of the glaciers was slow at first but accelerated afterwards. The remnants that created depressions are called prairie potholes Tundra, that bordered the continental glaciers, shifted northward with them as they retreated. FartherTundra, that bordered the continental glaciers, shifted northward with them as they retreated....
View Full Document

Page1 / 3

Chapter 20 - Chapter 20: The Holocene: Also known as The...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online