{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

But whether usefulness in promoting the welfare of society is in itself sufficient to account for th

But whether usefulness in promoting the welfare of society is in itself sufficient to account for th

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
But whether  usefulness  in promoting the welfare of society is in itself sufficient to account for the  universal approval that is accorded to justice is something that has been open to question, and it is  on this point that the inquiry is pursued. Hume is convinced that utility alone is a sufficient basis for  recognizing the obligations of justice, and the arguments which he presents are for the purpose of  supporting this conviction. One of the reasons which he advances for believing that justice is dependent on the existence of  certain conditions in human society is the fact that when all the needs of society are supplied, no one  is aware of any individual rights and hence there is no need for justice as a means for protecting  them. This view has something in common with the one advocated by Thomas Hobbes in the early  part of the seventeenth century. Hobbes had maintained that in the original state of humanity, which 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}