This letter emphasizes the fact that Celie is powerless to refuse to marry any man whom Fonso choose

This letter emphasizes the fact that Celie is powerless to refuse to marry any man whom Fonso choose

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: This letter emphasizes the fact that Celie is powerless to refuse to marry any man whom Fonso chooses as her husband. And Fonso is ready to get rid of her. Celie offers herself to Fonso, instead of Nettie, so that he can have sex while his new wife is sick. Fonso, of course, uses Celie and then he arrogantly says in Celie's presence that she is a "bad influence on my other girls." He says that Celie "ain't fresh" (isn't a virgin) and that she is "spoiled. Twice" (that is, Celie has had two children). Motherhood is a dirty word in Fonso's mouth; he has no feeling for Celie's (and other women's) sensitivity. To Fonso, Nettie has replaced Celie in the home. To him, Celie is nothing more than an aging beast of burden that must be disposed of because "the master" is now tired of it. Fonso's comments underscore this; he "praises" Celie to Mr. ________, but note how he does it. Celie, he says, "work underscore this; he "praises" Celie to Mr....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

Page1 / 2

This letter emphasizes the fact that Celie is powerless to refuse to marry any man whom Fonso choose

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online