In this chapter

In this chapter - In this chapter, Huxley continues his...

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Unformatted text preview: In this chapter, Huxley continues his presentation of dystopian social stability with a close look at the theory and practice of early conditioning. In the explanation of hypnopaedia and infantile conditioning, Huxley makes clear that the elimination of choice increases economic and social stability but diminishes the potential for human growth. The price of stability emerges most memorably in the scene in which Delta children predestined for rote factory work receive their conditioning to dislike the books and flowers. The image of happy babies crawling toward colorful books and beautiful blooms is filled with conventional sentimentality, but Huxley's reversal with the alarms and electric shock sharpens the reader's response. The reality of the conditioning represents its own legitimate argument against the theory of social, political, and economic stability. Note again Huxley's use of natural imagery as the social, political, and economic stability....
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In this chapter - In this chapter, Huxley continues his...

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