The second half of the chapter follows Bernard as he flies past the chiming Big Henry

The second half of the chapter follows Bernard as he flies past the chiming Big Henry

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The second half of the chapter follows Bernard as he flies past the chiming Big Henry — the Fordian  version of Big Ben — to the Fordson Community Singery. There he participates — without really  believing — in a kind of religious service that includes such rituals as the sign of the T, blessed  soma , and solidarity hymns. Under the influence of the sacramental  soma , the ceremony dissolves  into an "orgy-porgy" of sex. But while the others find the "calm ecstasy of achieved consummation," Bernard feels only more  isolated in his "separateness" — "much more alone, indeed, more hopelessly himself than he had  ever been in his life before." In this chapter, Huxley introduces the dystopian combination of religion and sex, featuring a date in a  cathedral/cabaret juxtaposed with a spiritual ritual that ends in an orgy. Henry and Lenina's dinner and dancing evening emphasizes the artificiality of their world. The night 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
Ask a homework question - tutors are online