2D03 Outline - Behavioural Processes (2D03) Animal...

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Unformatted text preview: Behavioural Processes (2D03) Animal Behaviour (2TT3) Instructor: ! ! Classes: ! ! Instructor: ! ! Office Hour: ! Dr. Brett Beston (bestonbr@mcmaster.ca) Tuesday (TSH 120, 7-10pm) ! ! Summer 2009 Dr. Brett Beston (bestonbr@mcmaster.ca) will be announced at beginning of semester(PC 107) Course Outline: Introduction to animal learning and behaviour will discuss the major classes of behaviour shared by most animals including humans. We will learn how natural selection, learning theory, and cultural transmission Introduction to animal learning and behaviour will discuss the major classes of behaviour shared by most ashapeincluding humans. We in fascinating ways. By the learning the course, students will understand the importance nimals animal behaviour will learn how natural selection, end of theory, and cultural transmission and animal behaviour in fascinating ways. By and apply scientific thinking for analysing novel problems of animal shape uses of studying animal behaviour the end of the course, students will understand the importance abehaviour. nd uses of studying animal behaviour and apply scientific thinking for analysing novel problems of animal Course Outline: behaviour. Course Objectives: Course Objectives: By the end of course, the students will: By the end of this this course, the students will: 1. Understand the importance and uses behaviour behaviour research 1. Understand the importance and uses of animalof animal research 2. Discuss the the two mechanisms that can change over time 2. Discuss two mechanisms that can change behaviour behaviour over time 3. Describe the the physiological mechanisms that control and generate behavio ur 3. Describe physiological mechanisms that control and generate behaviour 4. Apply scientific thinking for analyzing novel problems in animal behaviour 4. Apply scientific thinking for analyzing novel problems in animal behaviour 5. Detail the major components of behaviour, which are shared by mostanimal species 5. Detail the major components of behaviour, which are shared by most animal species 6. Explain human behaviour based on concepts and examples studied in the course 6. Explain human know how to draw graphs from data 7. Interpret graphs andbehaviour based on concepts and examples studied in the course 7. Interpret graphs and know how to draw graphs from data Course Materials Course Materials Dugatkin, L.A. 2009 Principles of Animal Behaviour. 2nd ed. All students are expected to read the relevant chapters in the textbook, which will Dugatkin, L.A. 2009 Principles of animal behaviour. 2nd the course web page supplement the lectures. Additional material may be provided on ed All students are expected to read the relevant chapters in the textbook, which will supplement the lectures. Additional material may be provided on the course web page 1 1 Course Evaluations: Term tests Term tests will be held during class time. Final examination The final examination will be held during the examination period at the end of the semester Evaluation Evaluation breakdown test 1 Lectures 1-4 (Oct 11th) 20% test 2 Lectures 5-9 (Nov 15th) 30% Final examination Cumulative 50% Missed test policy If you are absent from the university for a minor medical reason, lasting fewer than 5 days, you may report your absence, once per term, without documentation, using the McMaster Student Absence Form (http:// www.mcmaster.ca/msaf/). Absences for a longer duration or for other reasons must be reported to your Faculty/Program office, with documentation, and relief from term work may not necessarily be granted. When using the MSAF, report your absence to bestonbr@mcmaster.ca. You must then contact Dr. Beston immediately (normally within 2 working days) by email to learn what relief may be granted for the work you have missed, and relevant details such as revised deadlines, or time and location of a make-up exam. Please note that the MSAF may not be used for term work worth 30% or more, nor can it be used for the final examination. This includes test 2 and the final examination. Schedule of Tentative Topics and Test Dates (lecture slides will be made available on Avenue to Learn (http://avenue.mcmaster.ca)) Lecutre 1 Book Chapter Topic Introduction: Why learn about animal behaviour? Critical & Scientific thinking. Test / Assignment 3 Research approaches 2 Principles of animal behaviour 1 3 Evolution 2 4 Evolution 2 (and a small portion of 8) 5 The Control of Behaviour: Neural Mechanisms. 6 Learning 4 7 Learning 5 Extra reading (posted on A.T.L) 2 Test 1 (beginning of class) Lecutre Topic Book Chapter 8 Case Study: Evolutionary biology of bird song Extra reading (posted on A.T.L) 9 Life history; foraging 10 10 Anti-predator behaviour 11 11 Sex 6 12 Sex 6 Test / Assignment Test 2 (beginning of class) Course Policies: Details of the course requirements may change. If it becomes necessary to make changes to some part of the course during the term, reasonable notice and communication will be provided between the students and lecturer. Updates will be discussed in class and will be posted on the class web page. The instructor reserves the right to scale the final marks up or down depending on an individual’s overall performance based on special circumstances. Scaling: A+ = 90-100 ! B+ = 77-79 ! C+ = 67-69 ! D+ = 57-59! F = 0-49 A = 85-89 ! B = 73-76 ! C = 63-66 ! D = 53-56 ! ! A- = 80-84 ! B- = 70-72 ! C- = 60-62 ! D- = 50-52 *Final marks may be adjusted up or down on an individual basis, in light of special circumstances and or the student’s overall performance in the course.* Please do not request grade changes for reasons pertaining to scholarships, graduated school admission, or to maintain program requirements. E‐mail Policy: E‐mail must originate from your designated McMaster e‐mail account. If we (your professor or TA) need to contact you, we will send the e‐mail to your mcmaster.ca account. You should monitor this account regularly. E‐mails sent from third‐party providers (yahoo, hotmail, cogeco, sympatico, etc.) are likely to be missed. We have this policy for three reasons: (1) To reduce the amount of incoming spam to our accounts. (2) To ensure that we know with whom we are communicating. (3) To teach the professional use of e‐mail. Remember: E‐mails to your professors are professional communications. They should make a reasonable attempt to include correct spelling, punctuation, and should be polite and to the point. 3 Website Policy: This course uses ‘Avenue to Learn’ (http://avenue.mcmaster.ca). You are expected to check this website with regularity for announcements, updates, discussion board postings, and other valuable information. It is your responsibility to keep up with the information provided on this site. Use of the website’s discussion boards is strongly encouraged, and, in the case of non‐private inquiries (e.g., questions about course content and the running of this course, but not emails reporting illness or other private matters) is preferred to email communications. Questions asked on the discussion board allow other students with the same questions the chance to see the answer. Discussion board questions also provide a learning experience for students who attempt to answer these questions themselves. Inappropriate posts will be deleted from the board. Dr. Beston reserves the right to ban students from the course website if they use the board inappropriately (e.g., posting mean or other inappropriate comments). This will involve lost access to lecture slides and other important course information. Finally, students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e‐mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course instructor. Academic Integrity You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university. It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at http:// www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity 4 ...
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