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BIO335 2011 Lab Report Guidelines

BIO335 2011 Lab Report Guidelines - BIO 335 Lab Report...

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Unformatted text preview: BIO 335 Lab Report Guidelines V Lab Report Guidelines-1 THE LABORATORY REPORT – General guidelines Science depends on communication. Any discovery, no matter how groundbreaking, is valid only if it is published so that others can confirm it and build on it. The ability to relate what you have done and discovered is an essential skill for any scientist, (and in most other professions). Writing lab reports will develop this skill, and your reports will be an important measure of your performance (60% of final grade), Laboratory reports are usually due one week after completion of the laboratory exercise (see the schedule). This document should give you an idea of our expectations, and help you organize your work. The guidelines include I. Outlines of the report formats and what should be included in each section. II. Guidance on how to analyse and interpret physiological data. III. How to set about writing the report, with some tips on writing style. I. REPORT FORMAT AND CONTENTS Two types of lab report are required: short lab reports or worksheets, on single lab sessions, and full reports, usually based on two related lab sessions. Short reports will follow structured formats specified by instructors, and may include: Specified PRINT OUTS of your results Specific graphic results Short answers to questions about the preparation and experiments. Full reports follow the standard format of a scientific paper, and are organized in the following sections: Abstract/Summary Introduction Materials and Methods Experimental Results Discussion References Appendices Different content should be placed in each section, as outlined below. Specific guidelines may also include questions to be answered under these headings. Abstract/Summary This is a short (125-200 words) summary statement of the main aim of the experiment, the general experimental approach, and the major conclusions. Although it is the first part of the report to be read, it should be written last: only after you have worked out the entire report will you be able to condense it accurately. Introduction In this section you should describe the general physiological relationships (hypotheses) you are attempting to test, and provide relevant background information that is needed for a reader to understand what you did, and why. You can assume that your readers have a basic knowledge of physiology and neurobiology, so you need not explain fundamental concepts. However, they may need information about the specific preparation and the manipulations in use. BIO 335 Lab Report Guidelines V Lab Report Guidelines-2 Materials and Methods This section, in a research paper, is where experimental materials and technique are given in enough detail so that another knowledgeable scientist could replicate the experiment. You need not repeat the provided laboratory instructions, though these should be referenced . But any changes in method or material, or new manipulations not covered by the directions, should be noted here, and the reason for the change given. You can by the directions, should be noted here, and the reason for the change given....
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BIO335 2011 Lab Report Guidelines - BIO 335 Lab Report...

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