Hume admits that some of the rules for governing the conduct of people have been brought about in th

Hume admits that some of the rules for governing the conduct of people have been brought about in th

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Hume admits that some of the rules for governing the conduct of people have been brought about in  this manner, but he is vigorously opposed to the idea that this description is adequate to account for  all of them. That there is a strong element of selfishness in human nature is something that cannot  be denied, but it is also true that human beings are so constituted that within certain limits they  respond in a favorable way to that which promotes the welfare of others even though it brings no  direct advantage to themselves. Actions may arise from selfish interests, but it is also possible that  they may be the result of more generous motives. As much as we value our own happiness and  welfare, we cannot help but admire the conduct of persons who are willing to set aside their own  selfish interests in order to further the cause of justice and the welfare of humanity. Some writers in the field of ethics have maintained that the actions which are usually called altruistic 
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '11 term at University of Houston.

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