Hume rejects the assumptions on which this theory of morality is based

Hume rejects the assumptions on which this theory of morality is based

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Unformatted text preview: Hume rejects the assumptions on which this theory of morality is based. He does, however, recognize the element of truth which it contains. Human nature is selfish to some extent, but the doctrine that it is entirely selfish is like other false theories based on only a part of the truth. Human nature is both selfish and altruistic, or at any rate it is possible for actions to be either of one kind or the other. Nothing less than this assumption will account for the way in which human beings express their approval or disapproval of different types of conduct. That human nature has the capacity to act for something other than selfish ends is indicated in many different ways. Take, for example, the fact that any normal individual will approve acts of mercy and kindness which occurred in the distant past and which cannot possibly be regarded as having any...
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