metaphysical assumption A belief concerning the nature of the universe which can neither be proved n

Metaphysical assumption A belief concerning the nature of the universe which can neither be proved n

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Unformatted text preview: metaphysical assumption A belief concerning the nature of the universe which can neither be proved nor disproved. Mill, John Stuart An English philosopher (1806­73) whose writings in the fields of logic, ethics, psychology, and political science have been held in high esteem. naturalistic An explanation of religion and other phenomena without reference to any supernatural power. orthodox An orthodox believer is one who adheres to long­established customs and beliefs. oughtness A term that was used by Immanuel Kant to designate the sense of duty without reference to its particular content. Pericles A Greek statesman (498­429 B.C.) whose age was the most flourishing period of art and science experienced by that country. Plato A Greek philosopher (427­347 B.C.) who was the author of many famous dialogues, including the Republic, the Laws, and many others. One of the greatest minds of the ancient world. Pneumatical Philosophy, Ethics and The name given to one of the departments of learning in the University of Edinburgh. It is called pneumatical because it has to do with things of the spirit. practical reason This term was used by Immanuel Kant to designate that function of the mind that tells us what we ought to do. rationalist One who believes that reason is the primary source of truth. As this term is used in philosophy, it stands in contrast with empiricism, which regards experience as the main source of truth. Republic The name of one of Plato's most important dialogues. It has to do with the meaning of justice. skeptic One who doubts that the evidence supports the conclusion which has been drawn. Socrates A famous Greek philosopher (470­399 B.C.) who was the teacher of Plato and who died as a martyr for the cause of truth. ...
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