Much of the disputation that has occurred in philosophical writings has been due either to ambiguity

Much of the disputation that has occurred in philosophical writings has been due either to ambiguity

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Unformatted text preview: Much of the disputation that has occurred in philosophical writings has been due either to ambiguity or vagueness in the use of words. Since words derive their meaning from the way in which they are used and different people do not always use words in the same way to express what they mean, it is easy to understand why disputes of this nature should arise. Hume states that he has tried to avoid this difficulty by a sparse use of the terms virtues and vices. He has chosen rather to speak of those actions which are useful and agreeable or their opposites. In spite of this caution on his part, some of his critics have insisted that he used the terms virtues and vices to include talents or capacities and a lack of these, whereas he should have made a clear distinction between virtues and talents or vices and a lack of certain abilities. It is in defense of the way he has used the terms virtues and vices and a lack of certain abilities....
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Much of the disputation that has occurred in philosophical writings has been due either to ambiguity

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